Ecosystem Impacts of Oil & Gas Inputs to the Gulf

The ECOGIG Mission

ECOGIG's mission is to understand the environmental signatures and impacts of natural seepage versus that of abrupt, large hydrocarbon inputs on coupled benthic-pelagic processes in deepwater ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico, and to chart the long-term effects and mechanisms of ecosystem recovery from the 2010 Macondo well blowout.

  • Front view of the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Hercules collecting a glass sponge from a thicket of Lophelia pertusa coral in the Northern Gulf of Mexico.
    credit: Ocean Exploration Trust and ECOGIG, a GoMRI funded research consortium
  • Delicate glass sponge collected from a cold-water coral reef ecosystem in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. The sponge's tissue will later be analyzed for its stable isotopic composition.
    credit: Caleb King
  • An octopus rises in the water column to get a better view of Hercules.
    (credit: Ocean Exploration Trust and ECOGIG, a GoMRI funded research consortium)
    An octopus rises in the water column to get a better view of Hercules. (credit: Ocean Exploration Trust and ECOGIG, a GoMRI funded research consortium)
  • On July 5, 2013, ECOGIG hosted a media day at the docks in Gulfport, Mississippi. A group of about 20 representatives from local media outlets, the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative, the Stennis Space Center, the Port of Gulfport, and the University of Mississippi
    On July 5, 2013, ECOGIG hosted a media day at the docks in Gulfport, Mississippi. A group of about 20 representatives from local media outlets, the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative, the Stennis Space Center, the Port of Gulfport, and the University of Mississippi