Ecosystem Impacts of Oil & Gas Inputs to the Gulf

A nine-member research team, led by ECOGIG's Dr. Jeff Chanton, published a paper in the latest edition of the journal Environmental Science & Technology locating - for the first time -  6  to 10 million gallons of DWH  oil that are buried in the sediment on the Gulf of Mexico floor,  about 60 miles south east of the Mississippi Delta. The study used carbon 14, a radioactive isotope, to determine the locatio (oil does not have carbon 14 so it shows up readily when c14 is used). Researchers then used GIS  to create a map of the oiled sediment distribution on the sea floor. 

Interested in joiining the ECOGIG-2 Team? A number of PHD. positions are available across an interdisciplinary spectrum.  ECOGIG-2  students have the opportunity to work at sea on research vessels as well as carry out laboratory experiments. The project is highly collaborative, assuring interaction and cooperation with other ECOGIG-2 PIs, students and post docs, both in the US and at European institutions. IN addition, all students can participate in our vigorous Education and Public Outreach program.

Featured ECOGIG Student, Ting Ting Yang
Featured ECOGIG Student, Ting Ting Yang

 

Tingting Yang

Graduate student, Microbial ecology, Dr. Andreas Teske lab, Marine Sciences Dept., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

 

ECOGIG Photos

Pat Dunleavy assembles her exhibit, Living Life in the Extreme: Deep Sea Habitats and Exploring Them, in the main lobby of the Miller Learning Center on the Universtiy of Georgia campus. Thousands of students, faculty, and campus visitors pass through everyday. A descriptive slide show on a computer within the exhibit case enhanced the educational content, particularly regarding research cruises to the Gulf of Mexico. The exhibit was displayed for 3 months in 2012. (credit: Patricia G. Dunleavy)
Pat Dunleavy assembles her exhibit, Living Life in the Extreme: Deep Sea Habitats and Exploring Them, in the main lobby of the Miller Learning Center on the Universtiy of Georgia campus. Thousands of students, faculty, and campus visitors pass through everyday. A descriptive slide show on a computer within the exhibit case enhanced the educational content, particularly regarding research cruises to the Gulf of Mexico. The exhibit was displayed for 3 months in 2012. (credit: Patricia G. Dunleavy)

The ECOGIG Mission

ECOGIG's mission is to understand the environmental signatures and impacts of natural seepage versus that of abrupt, large hydrocarbon inputs on coupled benthic-pelagic processes in deepwater ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico, and to chart the long-term effects and mechanisms of ecosystem recovery from the 2010 Macondo well blowout.

Ecogig Videos

GOMRI is...

The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) investigates the impacts of the oil, dispersed oil, and dispersant on the ecosystems of the Gulf of Mexico and affected coastal States in a broad context of improving fundamental understanding of the dynamics of such events and their environmental stresses and public health implications. The GoMRI also develops improved spill mitigation, oil and gas detection, characterization and remediation technologies.

The ultimate goal of the GoMRI is to improve society’s ability to understand, respond to and mitigate the impacts of petroleum pollution and related stressors of the marine and coastal ecosystems, with an emphasis on conditions found in the Gulf of Mexico. Knowledge accrued will be applied to restoration and to improving the long-term environmental health of the Gulf of Mexico.